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‘Love of God’ most-sung in song survey

   
 


The assembled raise their voices together during worship at Mennonite Church Canada’s Assembly 2011 in Waterloo, Ont.

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Mennonite Church Canada/MennoMedia joint release
July 13, 2012
- Michael Spory

Winnipeg, MAN. —“The Love of God” is the song most sung in Canada and the US in the Hymnal: A Worship Book and their two supplements, Sing the Journey and Sing the Story, reports Amy Gingerich, director of print media for MennoMedia and co-chair of the Bi-National Worship Council, from a nine-month survey of songs-most-sung.

The survey was introduced to Canadians at Mennonite Church Canada’s Assembly 2011 in Waterloo, Ont., along with a study guide designed to help congregations explore how they worship, The Heart of Mennonite Worship: Five Vital Rhythms

In order to determine what songs Mennonites were already singing, congregations were asked to submit the songs they sang each week over the survey period, including music from special services and weekly events. The submissions of 191 congregations who sent in 32,000 entries were pointed to songs in the widely-used 20-year-old Mennonite hymnal and its supplemental song books. The results of the survey will help Mennonite Church Canada and Mennonite Church USA to determine the kinds of worship resources that will be needed over the next ten to fifteen years.

In Canada, the other top nine songs are:

  • Lord, You Sometimes Speak
  • Joy to the World
  • Will you let me be Your Servant
  • Praise God from whom All Blessings Flow
  • O Come, all Ye Faithful
  • Come, Thou Long-Expected Jesus
  • Great is They Faithfulness
  • O come, O come Immanuel
  • Je loueral I’Eternel (Praise, I will Praise you, Lord)

 “The results of this survey tell us what large congregations are singing compared to small congregations, as well as what urban versus rural congregations are singing,” Gingerich says. “The data also tells us what new songs have staying power and what old songs are no longer used. We will be spending lots of time analyzing the data to look for emerging patterns.

Other collections frequently cited included Christian Copyright Licensing International (CCLI), Mennonite Hymnal (1969), and Sing and Rejoice!, as well as a significant number of congregations that compile their own collections. Both Mennonite Church Canada and Mennonite Church USA had about 26 percent participation from their respective congregations, as well as five Mennonite education institutions from across the country.

Once organized, the complete data set will be given to the Bi-national Worship Council as committee members discern next steps toward a new song collection.

See complete coverage of Assembly 2012